eHam.net - Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net



[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radio License Exam

from Matt Robb, KD2OTG on March 16, 2018
View comments about this article!

No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radio License Exam

It was five minutes to noon and cold rain fell hard against a troop of girl scouts as they ran with poster-board projects from the door of the Hopewell Branch public library to their parentsí idling cars.

Iíll wait five more minutes, I thought as I sat dry in my own car watching through the rear-view mirror. The exam doesnít begin until twelve-fifteen. Maybe Iíll catch a break in the rain.


My amateur radio examination form received upon successfully passing written Element 2

I spent two months preparing for my Technician exam and set my eyes to attend the closest license session, a twenty-minute drive from my home that was sponsored by the Delaware Valley Radio Association (DVRA). By the time exam day arrived I had taken several online practice tests and passed most with a comfortable margin, missing only two or three questions on each attempt. Iíve got this, I thought.

Once inside the library meeting room, three welcoming gentlemen from the DVRA sat at a table in front. I took an available seat at a folding table and was surprised to see I was one of about fourteen people in attendance. I had expected three. The exam-takers were like me, mostly men in their thirties and forties, but there were two women and two high-school aged young men as well. With fourteen people in attendance, clearly amateur radio isnít a dying hobby.

With fourteen people in attendance, clearly amateur radio isnít a dying hobby.

At the scheduled start time the Volunteer Examination Coordinators (VEC) from DVRA explained a little bit about the test and walked the room distributing the materials, checking photo IDs, and collecting the nominal examination fee. And with that, we were free to begin the exam.

The room sat quiet for ten minutes until the first exam-taker, one of the high-school aged men, brought up his exam. The VEC sprung into action and each began the grading process. Another man then brought up his exam. Then another.

The noise level in the room grew a bit as the VEC spoke quietly grading the exam, calling out names and giving a ďthumbs upĒ sign indicating to those that they passed. At this point I was only about 2/3rds of the way through the exam.

It was at this moment I felt like I was back in grade school. My heart raced a bit as I envisioned myself being the last person to complete his exam. This is silly, I thought. So what if Iím the last person to complete the exam. I want to pass. I sat back in my chair, took a deep breath, then finished the questions at a leisurely pace. Donít let the noise level rattle you, I thought. You know the content well!

I spent another five minutes re-visiting each question and I changed my answer to only one. Surprisingly, it was a question that I had never encountered during any of the practice exams but felt eerily familiar as if it was likely the inverse of another question with which I was familiar.

I waited five minutes until my name was called and I was flashed a thumbs-up sign. Phew! A few minutes later I was called up to the table and asked to sign my examination form, then handed the top-sheet of a three-sheet carbon copy stack. I quietly collected my pencils, pushed in my chair, and left the room.

Twelve calendar days passed while I patiently checked the FCC Universal Licensing System page for validation of my call sign record. On November 30, I was officially assigned the call KD2OTG. I am now a licensed amateur radio operator.

Member Comments:
Add A Comment
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by W0WCA on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Good on you!
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by N0XAX on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Welcome to amateur radio Matt! It's only the beginning! Enjoy the ride! 73
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by K5UJ on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radio License Exam

Agree, now that you don't have to pass a CW test and folks can memorize all the answers and drill again and again on-line, passing the test should be a piece of cake.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by K3SSB on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congratulations and welcome to the fraternity. Now the real "hands-on" learning begins.

You may want to consider joining a local club. It's a great way to meet the hams in your area and to get answers to the questions that you're sure to have as you explore the hobby in depth.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by N9WW on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Agreed.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by KG4RUL on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
You now have in your hands a license to learn.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by KE7FD on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
First let me say congratulations Matt on getting your ticket! I hope you will grease the wheels by getting on the air and encouraging others to do likewise. I participated as a VE recently during a testing session. Most of the candidates passed the elements they prepared for, except one whom had never tested before. Despite our encouragement and assurances that taking any of the Amateur exams is challenging for many folks the first time around, I can't but wonder if this candidate will gather up the courage to try again. Often, people "appear out of nowhere" to test, having studied in a vacuum, all on their own without much if any contact with other hams or clubs to help guide them. I get it, that desire to be able to say that one did it all on their own, but even if one person fails to pass that first test, then walks away for good, many people fail, not just the candidate. I don't write this comment having a good solution in hand. I don't have a solid fix for this problem but rather an ask: What can we do to reach out to potential hams to be there to catch them when they fall? More importantly, how do we get involved earlier to help them succeed so they don't fall? The ARRL and other national groups invest heavily in out-reach efforts, clubs do their part as much as they can and each of us I would hope steps up as a willing Elmer to anyone we meet who shows and interest in getting their license.

Sure, I don't know what became of this candidate of whom I speak, perhaps she passed the test the following week at another testing session. And that's just it, had this candidate been connected with other hams, then there's a guarantee that [eventually] another callsign would be issued.

Glen - KE7FD
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by KK6HUY on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
I was very confident. 49 years old at the time. Youngest but one in the room by 10 years easy. That was dismaying. But overall a very positive experience, as was the upgrade to General, which was a couple of months later. The examiners, who are volunteers, in particular deserve praise. They didn't have to be drag themselves out on a Saturday morning but did, and were nice about it. I'm not sure I would have managed with such grace.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by NZ6G on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
K5UJ, With that attitude I'm sure you won't be bothered by any pesky new hams looking for an elmer.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by K0UA on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
A very well written article. Welcome to Amateur Radio. If you get stuck building a station, don't hesitate to reach out. Shoot me an email, and I will respond. I will give you my phone number and we can chat about anything you are having trouble with. I don't have all the answers, but I have been licensed for 47 years and have seen a couple of things. :) I have been helping a lot of guys get on the new digital modes, and how to interface computers and radios seems to be one of my specialties. Again, you are a very good writer, and tell a good and uplifting story. 73 James K0UA
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by WB4M on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for a very timely article! Both my XYL and nephew are presently studying for their Technician license and will take the test at the end of this month.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by K8QV on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
As a VE, an old timer, a relic, a dinosaur in the hobby, I get amused at times. One of those times when people sweat bullets over taking the current exams. Picture this scenario from the olden days: You wake up the morning of your exam and take that long ride down to the nearest FCC office. You sign in and sit at one of the folding chairs in the large, cold, intimidating government institutional green and eggshell room. You listen to the code tape and hope you are getting a long enough string of correct characters as you gauge the others frantically writing and scratching out their copy. Passing that, you move on to the written test and hope you don't get confused when drawing schematics of circuits and components. Of course you've memorized all the rules, too, right? Remember, you learned all this from books and study and no shortcuts or Internet at your disposal. Now, THAT'S intimidation!

 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by K0UA on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
I still remember the FCC examiners name. Yes she made that big of an impression on me when she screamed "pencils down" as the last dit from the code tape was still echoing around the room. :) This was one harsh no nonsense woman. Her name was Etta Birdsong. This was in the Kansas City office over 40 years ago. And yes the furniture and decor was exactly as you described it. Good times.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by KE6EE on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Yes the government decor in the old Customs House in downtown San Francisco in 1958. There may have been as many as 15 test-takers back then and I am sure I was the youngest at 14. My pal was several months older than I.

I was surprised to be one of the minority who passed the 13 wpm code test. I remember the nasty glances of the adults who failed and who had to leave the room. Especially hateful was the look of my pal who always considered me to be even more an idiot than he. His well-worn terms for me were "klutz" or "fool" or a combination.

Fortunately the schematics I had to draw were ones I had practiced drawing.

The rest of my ham history is much less vivid.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by KC9MWD on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
I remember when I took the test nearly 10 years ago. I studied and studied until I mastered the tech pool. I was nervous (sacred) to take the test so I studied more. One day I was feeling good and I took the exam and passed tech. The VE asked if I wanted to try general and I said I hadn't prepared enough. He said give it a try. Since I was there already it wasn't going to cost anything and it would be good practice. I went for it and PASSED.
If it wasn't for the encouragement of that very positive VE I'm not sure where I'd be. I'm looking to take the extra test in the near future.
This is a wonderful hobby where (hopefully) you never stop learning. I have had the pleasure of talking to like minded people all over the world. So many different cultures, customs, and viewpoints to learn about. Yes, it's a wonderful hobby.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by AB3MO on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
In my lifetime, I've taken such a great variety of exams, I no longer spook (except for physicians!). The Novice (1596) and Conditional (1957) exams were easy; the code test was a challenge. Took all three elements in 35 minutes in 2011. No, I didn't, and didn't need to, memorize the answers!!
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by N4KC on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!

I jokingly say the exam was a lot easier when I took it so long ago because AC current had not been invented yet.

I do wonder, though, how many of those who claim the test is easy nowadays could pass the exam themselves. Truthfully, there is so much more--technically and rules-wise--than there was when I took my Extra exam in the '70s. Things like satellite technology, digital communications, integrated circuits, digital logic, and so much more.

It takes effort. You made that effort. You now have, as someone else noted, a license to learn. Congrats, Matt. I hope you enjoy the hobby as much as I have. And am!

73,

Don N4KC
www.n4kc.com
www.donkeith.com



 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by VE6BGM on March 16, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
I was nervous to take the Canadian exam because I had not attended any classes. I really didn't memorize the questions as much as I did trying to understand them. This took about 9 months until I felt that I knew enough to at least get 70% which is required in Canada. So off I went to our then, Industry Canada offices. Sitting in the office, I was joined by 10 other people. Not knowing any of them, I assumed they were there for their amateur exam as well. We were taken into a room and sat around a long table. The examiner then asked how many were there for their Restricted Operator Certificate With Aeronautical Qualification. My anxiety increased slightly as I thought that their question bank would be longer and harder than the amateur radio question bank. About 5 minutes after we started, some people taking the Aeronautical exam started putting their hands up. This was puzzling to me when I was looking at 100 questions and had barely covered 30 question. The examiner would come over and check the answers to the Aeronautical exam and explain what questions the people had missed. Soon I was sitting in the exam room solo. 20 minutes later, I finally finished and passed my exam to the Industry Canada examiner. I then asked him about the Aeronautical exam and learned that their question bank was only 25 questions. He then told me I had passed. On the way home I felt pride as I had managed to pass an 100 question exam when others in the room only had to worry about 25.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by K8YZK on March 17, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Taking the Novice with a General (neighbor) giving me the test, and watching him seal and mail it in to the FCC. Then waited and waited and waited for the license to come in the mail. Then off 30 miles to the federal building and the FCC office, sitting with about a dozen others, and a FCC engineer doing the test, no smile, no hello, just if your name is called, sorry maybe next time. What is the old saying 3 strikes and you are out. Well first time failed the code, second time fail the written, third time a charm. Yet still had to wait, and wait and wait to see if you up graded or not. Now that is being intimidated. Now Advance was a piece of cake, and Extra, 20wpm was easy and test was easy and I took it on the hood of a Ford pickup. When my son took his at 15 I told him don't worry because this in not a life or death moment and don't look at the other people because they are thinking the same way you are no matter how old or young they are.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by KJ4DGE on March 17, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats Matt, and welcome aboard. I could relate to your anxiety a bit as I read your words. Its something YOU WANT to pass! That being said. I was allowed to take the General at the same time (2003) as the tech exam I passed and with no study, I failed that class license by like 7 questions.

That only made me more determined to advance my "ticket" up a notch. I set goals in my life over the past 25 years. One was the HAM license, the next was the COMPTIA security + CE test for work. Got the General in 2008 and the Security + in 2013.

I will not as others might, push you to upgrade your license, just enjoy what you have earned and have fun. In time I am sure you will decide on your own whether you want more.

Try Echolink now and simplex FM on two meters, and not just 146.520. There are some areas very active off repeaters for local groups. Enjoy a good ragchew on your local club repeater or simplex, experiment with building a 2 meter beam or dipole from stuff around the house. Try working a SAT with your HT. Loads of things you can do on the higher bands.

73
KJ4DGE
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by KB2SMS on March 17, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats Matt! Welcome!
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by NN2X on March 17, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats Matt!


Welcome to a Hobby you will enjoy for the rest of your life!

In my time, it was the old and musty FCC building in NY..

I spent many times there, NOT Only the Ham tickets, but the commercial licenses as well...I practically I lived there for several years, passing and failing, and going back again! The Extra Class, with code was a fun one!

See you on the bands Matt! And congrats!

NN2X, Tom
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by KI3R on March 17, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Welcome to the service ........ Please join a club ... help out and spread the enjoyment. DO NOT be put off by any "characters" you will meet as you will meet your fair share of them over the years to come.

God Bless ..... Tom Popovic KI3R Belle Vernon PA
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by AC2RY on March 18, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congratulations! But now start study for next phase - General license. There most fun begins: HF voice. Number of questions are the same between Element 2 and 3, thus it makes sense to do it quicker, before you forgot what you already know.
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by K5LXP on March 18, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
My FCC examiner story is I skipped school and me and a couple of buddies borrowed their sister's car and we drove from Milwaukee to the federal building in Chicago. Can't remember what the other guys were upgrading to but I had my 20wpm code certificate that was only good for a year and I had to pass the extra, or start over. Probably 20 to 25 people in that room taking one exam or the other, both commercial and amateur. Stern faced examiner with a military looking flattop. Probably saw so many faces, passes and failures in his tenure they did't register anymore. Had 2 calculators with me in case one quit. Ground through the exam then it was back to the desk to wait. I was motioned up and he handed me the paperwork just saying "you passed", then surprisingly he smiled and said "you only missed one, congratulations". I was elated. Walked out with my interim permit and the rest is history. I still have the picture of me and my buddies standing together each holding our respective interim permits. But it bugs me to this day, what one question did I miss?

A number of years ago I was a VE for a while and had the privilege of handing out CSCE's. I always remembered my day at the FCC and what it was like to make the experience a little personal. Back when there was still a code test I would write down the code test along with the applicants so that even if they didn't pass, they could see that it was possible. With the VE programs I've been involved with I don't think it could be more inviting to take a test. Teams bend over backwards to set up test sessions and make the process as accommodating as possible. A great way to start a lifelong hobby in this great fraternity.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by KB6QXM on March 18, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Glad to see new hams coming into the ranks. It is a lot more difficult these days to retain the new hams today as there is so many more CC&Rs and HOAs and "visual impact" proponents and lets not forget the "distracted driver" laws with no amateur radio exemptions. You cannot easy put up a tower because of all of the items listed above.

If you can put up a tower, then you might have to go through all o the permitting process and pay all of these fees. Of course this could be in states that like to tax highly and tell you what you can and cannot do in reference to amateur radio.

With all of the HOAs and CC&Rs, you cannot even put up a dipole. Yes, granted the license may be a lot easier with the publication of the question pool and the elimination of the code and not having to go to a FCC office, so the license experience maybe not as stressful as it once was, but obtaining a license is only half the battle, what do you do once you have the license?

In areas like the area I live in, if you do not have a CC&R or HOA because of the single family dwelling housing you live in, you are crammed into high-density housing. The only way is to live far far away from neighbors and commute a long ways to where you work.

I think that present days new hams have it a lot easier when it comes to licensing, but with all of these obstacles for new hams to use other than VHF/UHF the world of amateur radio is a difficult place.

 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by NQ4T on March 19, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
I too have to admit I was a little nervous going in for the first exam. Years of test-taking told me I could study like crazy...and wind up drawing a blank on something.

But it wasn't anything like taking tests back in school. For starters, failing just meant I had to try again. It wasn't going on a permanent record or anything. Yet, there was something about the desire to want this that just made the nerves kick in to overdrive. It was kind of like the first time I flew commercial. I studied and read everything I was supposed to do...and how I was supposed to do it...and I studied the behavior of everyone in line in front of me; and even once I got through the security theater and the "hard stuff" was over; there was still this little bit of unknown as I found myself sitting on a jet for the first time waiting for that thing to take off.

My second test of that session went a lot easier. The pressure was off and I knew I was getting a license. I didn't exactly whiz through my general but compared to the stress of the technician test it felt quick.

My extra was a different story. Sure, I was a bit nervous; there's a lot of stuff in that question pool...and I forgot my printed copy of my license when I left for the hamfest at 4 that morning. I went to the session more worried about having forgotten my license copy than the fact I was about to take the extra. That turned out to be no big deal as the VECs looked at the ULS listing on my phone and said that's all the needed. I took that test in to the session not knowing what to expect...but calmer than I remember my first exam session.

It was a pretty packed session being a hamfest, lots of people working for their first license and a few people doing upgrades. I lucked out and was one of the first in the exam room. I could almost tell who was taking for the first time...I recognized that look of nervousness and confusion as many of them slowly took the exams. I too sat and started reading my questions. I looked through the entire exam before I started answering anything. There were only 4 questions on the entire thing I wasn't sure of. I was relieved...I didn't sleep well the night before because hamfests excite me; and the idea of possibly getting general was exciting. So I was literally running on fumes and caffine when it came time to exam.

I missed three.

The exam session was in a school, so the test-takers were in the cafeteria/audiorium and the rest of the people waiting to test or waiting for results were off in another room. I once again could almost tell who was examing for the first time simply from their faces. I sat down in an empty chair next to a young guy (I'm not that old but the dude was probably in high school) and waited. He commented I wasn't in there very long and I said I hadn't been keeping track of time. He said he was going for tech, his jaw dropped when I said I took extra. HE just went on about how nervous he was for tech and how he couldn't imagine having done the "big extra" test in the amount of time I did. So I said I was going to give him a piece of advice:

"You know what they call the guy who graduates last in his medical class? Doctor. It doesn't matter how quickly you take this exam, it doesn't even matter how many you get wrong. The only thing that matters here is if you pass. There's no extra credit, there's no bonus. The guy who aces his tech exam will get a license the same as the guy who missed every single one allowed."

I saw that kid later as the hamfest was winding down; he got his tech.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by N4MQ on March 20, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
My mom drove me into D.C. to take the test at the FCC building and I was so ready, having copied W1AW at almost 20 WPM.

When the code began I panicked as it was ALL DIFFERENT - NO STATIC clean code and I was lucky to get 63 characters out of the required 65 - Fail.

That nite I turned down the gain till it was clear CW and the next month I passed with flying colors and only sent a few words before being told thats enough. The code passed I aced the written test as that was all I thought of for months, PHEW finally now to wait for the mail.......WN3BEG and now N4MQ.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by SWLCHRIS on March 20, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Great to hear. I myself have been a SWL since 1990 and attempted the ham test back then in early 90's when no code Tech was out and I missed novice by 2 wpm on CW, I just couldn't get the dits down with the dots. Fast forward 25 years to 2017 when my interest in ham radio came back up listening to hams on the bands with my Ten Tec RX320. Did some online testing , took three tries to pass the Technicians test but got it finally in March.Working 10 meter band talked to Louis YV5ENI and that stoked my dx fires. Studied for General online while at work and passed first try on Field Day 2017. Working General bands on HF I kept hearing all the great DX on the other portions allocated to Extra, so studied for that at work while systems were down and went and passed that March 3,2018. So went from zero to amateur radio hero in one easy year. Well not so easy cause I got a lot to learn on certain modes and I have to relearn my CW. Best of all the hobby is fun no matter what grade of license you have.
KC3SWL
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by K5YQL on March 20, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Welcome! I was intimidated taking all three.
Great hobby. K5YQL
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by W7CXC on March 25, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
As an old timer, a relic, a dinosaur in the hobby, I get amused at times.(cut and pasted in part). For me it was a trip from Providence RI up to The FCC office in Boston. As I recall we took the train on a cold and rainy New England day. Much the same experience and for a "child" of thirteen the general code and written test was quite an adventure. Had gotten up to about 18 wpm so the code was not to bad but still stressful. It was much much harder to make the jump from Novice to General than from General to Extra, about 20DB harder. My mentor was W1YKQ, sadly long departed.

As others have said after the test then the real learning begins.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by WA9MQM on March 27, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congratulations, Matt. You are now able to participate in what is probably the most interesting and diverse hobby there is.

Taking your exam in a room at the local library reminded me of my experiences many years ago, like over 50 years ago. Back then the exam had to be taken at an FCC office unless you met some ability to travel or distance exemptions. At the time I lived about 40 miles from Chicago and was required to appear in person at the FCC office in downtown Chicago. At the time, the FCC office was in one of those massive, ornate, and impressive U.S. government buildings built in the early 1900's. The exam room had a large, massive table that looked like it would still be around for another thousand years and had chairs to match. The dreaded code machine was on a corner of the table ready to claim its victims in the first round of the exam. The machine got me the first time but my second trip was a success. Some years later I again made the trip to the FCC in Chicago to take the Advanced Class exam but the old building was gone and replaced by a new steel and glass skyscraper. The exam room was on the 18th floor and had the blah look of a plain room with high school type desks. None of that WOW! type feeling like the old building had. I was 16 when I took the exam for the first time and maybe I did feel intimidated but the experience really left an impression on me. An experience I'm happy to remember.
 
No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Radi Reply
by W1WH on March 30, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Congratulations, Matt!

Bill, W1WH
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by BOOMBA on March 31, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
If you study with HamTestOnline it's pretty much a giveaway test. Unless you have mental issues this is really easy so don't sweat it. Go for it!!
 
RE: No Reason To Feel Intimidated Taking Your First Amateur Reply
by KC5CQD on April 1, 2018 Mail this to a friend!
Yep. And now we have hams that canít even program their HTs. I see it all the time.
 
Email Subscription
You are not subscribed to discussions on this article.

Subscribe!
My Subscriptions
Subscriptions Help

Related News & Articles
My First Amateur Radio Transceiver: BaoFeng BF-F8HP


Other Editorial Articles
My First Amateur Radio Transceiver: BaoFeng BF-F8HP
The Most Exciting Era in Amateur Radio